28th May
2012
written by Todd Harrison

This is a two part video on my Apple II Plus.  In part one I do a teardown and cleanup then give a little history.  Part two shows some trouble shooting repair, video adjustment and some old 1982 computing demo action; A.K.A porn for those over 38. (Click photos for HI-RES).

(VIDEO I)

(VIDEO II)

I got this Apple II Plus off eBay for $200 but the shipping was $160 being the auction included two large boxes of Apple stuff including the computer, monitor, two disk drives, , modem, game controller, cables and lots of books, manuals, magazines and software. It was very well packaged which was nice but also added to the shipping cost. In the auction the drives were reported as “not working” but it turned out only one was having an issue but we get to the bottom of that later.

The very first computer I ever used was an Apple II Plus in high school and I couldn’t get enough time on this machine. I was more than fascinated by computers I was obsessed. Every minute learning on the Apple was a joy to me but later my parents got me a Commodore 64 home computer which consumed me for years. I still took every computer class I could in high school where all the assignments were on the Apple II Plus and I think we had Apple IIe computers by my senior year.

At the time, 30 years ago now, I learned that the BASIC for the Apple II Plus called “Applesoft” was very much like the BASIC on the Commodore 64 so I was able to do a lot of the homework at home on my Commodore and them make just a few alterations to convert it to Applesoft BASIC. What I didn’t know at the time was that Applesoft BASIC and Commodore BASIC were both written by Microsoft and base on the Microsoft BASIC interpreter with of course some differences to work on the target PC.

Well enough about me lets get on with the cleanup and teardown. To cleanup the 30 years of dirt and yellowing I stripped everything down to just plastic and metal frame. Then I used this Clorox kitchen cleaner with bleach. A good scrub brush and some hot water made the cases look like new.  I used 99.95% isopropyl alcohol to clean the monitor screen.

 

CLICK TO READ ALL —>:

 

As you can see in the below photo the computer case is quite clean were the monitor is still covered in 30 years of goo.

Being I wanted to also scrub up the monitor case I had to remove the guts which was not that bad of a job for this “Monitor III”. If you don’t know how to discharge a CRT you best not try this yourself because the tub can hold a lethal charge. Disassembling the monitor also helps in cleaning out all the years of dust. Here is a tip when removing the CRT from an old monitor: Mark where the retention fasteners are in relation to the CRT and plastic case because you can change the horizontal level by rotating the CRT in its mounts. The “Monitor III” has about 5 degrees of rotational clearance either way via the mounts and you want that to be back to its original location when you reassemble.

These old Apple monitors have a built in anti reflection screen make of some kind of taut black silk. You have to take out the CRT to get it out and after blowing it clean wipe it down good with 99.95% isopropyl alcohol. Also clean the CRT glass with 99.95% isopropyl alcohol.

Look below! All is clean and as new looking as the day it was built in late 1982. I know this date because I couldn’t find any chip dates later than “8238” which is chip date code for 38th week of 1982.

What a thing of beauty, now days we would call this a motherboard. Look how nicely those chips are all lined up, the layout is just marvelous.

Apple calls it a Main Logic board as you see in this photo.

And the name makes a lot of sense once you see all the 74xxx logic chips on this board. ANDs, NANDs, ORs, NORs and other such logic everywhere.

In 1982 you could order the Apple II Plus with 16, 32 or 48K of memory. As  you can see on the sticker on the bottom of the PC case mine is a 48K version.

But the last 2K of RAM is missing on my motherboard!

That is because this computer had been upgraded to 64K of RAM using what was called a “Language Board”.  The language board plugs into the last 2K slot of the main logic board memory sockets and allows bit shifting into the extra 16K of RAM onboard the language board. This means on boot the Master System disk will load integer BASIC into the extra memory of the language card automatically and you can then switch to integer BASIC and back to Applesoft BASIC without using up any low 48 RAM. Nice! You can also load other languages into the language card like FORTRAN and PASCAL.

Below is an upside-down shot of the process you will find in many computers of the day. The Apply II Plus used the MOS Technology 6502 which was designed by the same team of engineers that once worked for Motorola on their 6800 processor. The 6502 was a lower cost processor targeted for the calculator and early 8 bit computer industry. Where the Motorola 6800 sold for $300 the MOS Technology 6502 sold for only $25. I covered a little more history in the video but I looked this all up on Wikipedia and you can too.

If you had any question that Microsoft wrote the Applesoft BASIC interpreter the markings on this chip should convince you of the fact.

The reason for the Applesoft BASIC flavor of Microsoft BASIC is because the original integer BASIC interpreter by Steve Wozniak could only work with integers from about -32K to +32K making floating point calculations like in finical software very difficult. Microsoft was contracted by Apple to write a floating point BASIC interpreter that worked on the Apple II and thus was born the Apple II Plus. Without this upgrade Apple would not have been able to compete in the business arena. I’m sure Steve Wozniak could have create a floating point (FP) BASIC but he was tapped out on getting the DISK II drive system and DOS to market which was also required if Apple wanted to be a real PC competitor. Apple’s real genius was how they marketed and especially how they marketed and bundled to the low $ market of schools.

Speaking of DISK II drives this is one amd it required a drive control card to be installed in the computer case.

But one of these disk drive control cards can control two DISK II drives.

The card had to be installed in slot #6 because the Apple II Plus would pole this slot for a drive on startup and if it found a drive it would then start the boot program on the disk. If this was a Master System disk it would boot DOS and append the DOS “disk operating system” instructions to the Applesoft BASIC commands.  Well in truth DOS just runs in the background and intercepts all keyboard and program commands and if they turn out to be disk drive commands DOS would execute them before passing off the none DOS commands. You could have more than one of these disk drive control cards in other slots but you would have to address them by slot number being the default disk slot was six.

The Apple II and Apple II Plus had one unfortunate feature. There as a reset key just above the return key which users could easily fat finger and reset their computer.

When this would happen the user would lose all their work if it was not saved but the program did stay in memory. In later versions like the Apple IIe this was recognized as a fail and the reset key was moved.  When cleaning my keyboard I did notice a switch on the underside that read “ctrl + reset”/”rest” I think this might be an added feature to my keyboard so that the reset will not work unless the ctrl key is also pressed. I did read that such a feature had been implemented but what I had read said this was a software patch not a hardware fix. I will have to try it someday.

I also got this nice Hayes modem “Microcoupler”. Not sure what baud but really not that important. I don’t even think I will re-install it being I’m not going to be getting on any old bulletin boards.

This is a nice photo of the inside of the Apple’s power supply. Real clean and I see a glass fuse so if  your old Apple has no power check this simple to replace fuse.

The monitor came all dorked up so when I first powered up I had the back case of the monitor off so I could adjust everything correctly. The monitor worked great and has a very sharp clear focus once it was fixed. I even got a free adjustment tool out of the deal being I found this yellow adjustment tool still inside the monitor left by the dork that dorked it, I’m guessing.

It’s time to put it all back together. I still love how easy the Apple II’s were for servicing. So easy to just pop the top off and add/remove expansion cards, what a delight!

Testing time. As I said I had to start with the monitor open so this is why I have it layed out like this on the bench.

You can’t use the disk drives unless you boot DOS from the master system disk. Without DOS booted you can only read and write to audio cassette. But what was nice is that Apple II supported audio cassette natively and worked with any cassette deck using just simple 1/8 inch audio headset/mic cables.

BEFORE you put any disks in a drive that has not been cleaned in a week or more you MUST run a disk cleaning kit to clean the read right heads. This is never more true than after shipping or storage. For the Apple DISK II drives make sure you have a single sided cleaner or have the upper opening of a double sided cleaner disk covered so you don’t damage the upper disk pressure felt that comes down on the top of the disk. A spinning double sided cleaning disk might damage this felt.

It’s ALIVE!!!

The drives didn’t boot but when I took out the disk drive control card the Apple started up into its native Applesoft command prompt.  See!!! I typed in a one line BASIC program that added 5+5 when ran. Not bad after 30 years, tons of fun!

I then tried the 2nd drive and it worked fine so I was able to boot DOS and it loaded interger BASIC onto the language card too.  Later I fixed the other drive by simply pulling all the socketed chips out and reseating them in their sockets. Never forget to try this trick when working on old equipment with socketed chips.

Here I show the “INT” command that switches over from Applesoft BASIC to integer BASIC on the language card.

It took me a few tries to remember the command to get back to the native Applesoft BASIC on the ROMs “FP”. Makes sense now “FP” means Floating Point and that was what was so important about Applesoft.

Yeah so sweet! The old “CATALOG” command to get a list of files on the disks. You could access other drive drives too but you had to include the drive number and the card slot.  So the 2nd drive on the default slot would be “CATALOG D2” and the 2nd drive on another controller in say slot 5 would be “CATALOG D2, S5”. Soon an so forth.

In the CATALOG you see the “*” which means the file is locked and can not be deleted or written.  The “A” for Applesoft BASIC program, “I” for integer BASIC, “T” for a text file and “B” for binary file.  The number of disk sectors the file is using on the disk where each sectors is 256 bytes. Then of course the file name.

This is a test pattern you can start from the master system disk to help set the screen size and other pot setting on the monitor’s control board.

A “LIST” command shows the boot program that starts when the master system disk is booted. SO HARD to read and everything is upper case, even programs run in 40 column upper case so it gets a bit tiring on the eyes.

A phone list program loaded from the master system disk shows just how crazy such command screen programs looked back in the day.

And entering data was just as crazy.

Well thanks for joining my on my journey down memory lane.

Bye and don’t forget to subscript to my YouTube Channel if you’re interested in what I think is fun.

 Update 12-20-2012:

A subscriber contacted me and needed details on the keyboard cable that connects the logic board to the keyboard PCB board so they could fabricate a missing cable. This is the best place for me to report my findings including photos. Click photos for hi-res. First photo is of the ribbon cable connected to the keyboard PCB board. The pin-outs are clearly labeled on the back of the plastic connector 1-16.

Next photo is of the socket on the keyboard PCB board. I’m pointing at the white silk-screened dot that marks pin one and it matches the keyboard socket connector labeling.

Now for that same keyboard ribbon cable on the logic board. Here to0 the socket connector is marked 1-16.

The last photo shows the keyboard socket on the logic board where you can once again see the white silk-screened dot marking pin one.

To wrap up my findings I did ohm out the ribbon cable to make sure that pin 1 did map to pin 1 on both ends of the cable. So making your own cable is simple, just follow the socket pin markings and normal dip label order and you’re golden. No funny switching over or crossing of lines like you sometimes see on old IDE drives. I hope that help the person that asked for this information and others looking for the Apple II plus keyboard cable pin-outs.

 

106 Comments

  1. [...] parent's attic isn't going to clean itself, is it? [Todd] put up a series of videos tearing down a 1982 Apple ][ plus, cleaning everything along the way, and doing a very nice demo of AppleSoft BASIC. This is where [...]

  2. [...] parent's attic isn't going to clean itself, is it? [Todd] put up a series of videos tearing down a 1982 Apple ][ plus, cleaning everything along the way, and doing a very nice demo of AppleSoft BASIC. This is where [...]

  3. alfredo ricciotti
    03/06/2012

    Thanks for all the effort. Time to recover that old Apple// lying around.

  4. Marlon
    03/06/2012

    Great Job!!

  5. fr4nk
    03/06/2012

    No retr0brite? Well, it turned out great anyway.
    Nice article!

  6. 03/06/2012

    @alfredo ricciotti: Yes, TONs of fun!

  7. 03/06/2012

    @fr4nk: I was thinking about using something like retr0brite but every time I go to cleanup old plastics I find that “Clorox kitchen cleaner with bleach” does the job. But I’m sure I will run into something someday that is too yellow-ed and damaged for Clorox. Thanks for reminding my about the retr0brite name, I will find it now when I do need it.

  8. Will
    03/06/2012

    It looks like the second disk drive is some kind of clone, it’s not an Apple Disk ][ drive. Is it a Franklin, maybe?

    Anyhow, thanks for the videos. The Apple II+ was just slightly ahead of my time, I cut my teeth on the Apple //e which had more memory and a less goofy keyboard. I’m going to have to fire it up and see if it can still boot.

  9. 03/06/2012

    I was 13 years old in 1979 and had gotten my TRS-80 Model 1 Level II 16K machine. Added the Expansion Interface and disk drives a year later. Had the machine all tricked out, even made the mod to support lowercase.

    Interestingly enough – that board on that machine was NOT socketed and used the same 74LS type logic with the exception being a Z80 CPU.

    And at school we had CBM’s – they were Commodore’s business class machine. Had a full keyboard instead of that crappy calculator keyboard.

    Lots of machines used the 6502 processor though. Apple of course, Commodore, Atari (even the 2600 used one!)

  10. [...] parent's attic isn't going to clean itself, is it? [Todd] put up a series of videos tearing down a 1982 Apple ][ plus, cleaning everything along the way, and doing a very nice demo of AppleSoft BASIC. This is where [...]

  11. grammar nazi 9000
    03/06/2012

    Nice shop, btw. Mine is filled with broken robots.

  12. 03/06/2012

    The reset key problem was a common topic in computing magazines back in the day. My favourite solution I read about was to pop the keycap off and put a small O-ring over the post, put the cap back and voila – the reset won’t be triggered from a simple mistype but requires a bit of pressure to work. Simple!

  13. 03/06/2012

    @Steve: yes, I remember that too. And just remove the key and leave it off was used. The Apple IIe fixed this issues and had a much better keyboard layout.

  14. 03/06/2012

    @Tony P: I have a TRS-80 in a box someplace here. It is the color coco 3 version I think. With the small chiclet keyboard. I also have the manuals. I think I will put it up on eBay being I’m not a TRS-80 coco collector. It just came with another PC I did want.

    My 8yr old son likes trying to code on the commodore and apple so my hobby with old computers is coming in handy for him.

  15. 03/06/2012

    @Will: Yes the Apple IIe had a much better keyboard. We had 4 or 6 of them at my high school before my last year but the first one they had was the Apple II Plus and that is what I was so mad to use. I did use the Apple IIe boxes more in the end but you just can’t replace your first. Ha!

  16. [...]  |  ToddFun  | Email this | Comments Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a [...]

  17. 04/06/2012

    [...]  |  ToddFun  | Email [...]

  18. Zorin
    04/06/2012

    (I tried making this comment on the Youtube video, but commenting seems to be broken for me. I really wanted to tell you this because it’s a great gateway to finding neat software for this machine!)

    You can download a binary disk image of Oregon Trail on the internet (just do a Google search). Getting it on a physical floppy is a bit harder, though.

    This software makes it possible: adtpro.sourceforge.net

    It uses the cassette interface; the software comes as audio files that get played into it by your computer. Then you tell the software to send the dsk image and it does. It’s slow but it works. :)

  19. 04/06/2012

    Your newer 74LS125 chip in that disk drive is easy to explain. You’ll notice that the drive ribbon cable physically will connect in either orientation, if you plug it in backwards and power the computer on that chip will die in a little puff of smoke. At that point the only fix is a new chip.

  20. 04/06/2012

    @Zorin: Thanks, that sound so simple now that you say it, I should have known that was possible. I will do that this weekend. I just fixed an old cassette player so that will be a good test for both. Thanks again.
    Todd

  21. 04/06/2012

    Yup, I figured as much being the underside of the drive case had a black SPLAT just above the chip. And a YouTube viewer posted the same comment. Thanks.

  22. 04/06/2012

    Holy Crap! This brings me back. EXCELLENT WORK! Thank you so much for your time on this project. It makes me yearn for my Apple IIGS and that Helicopter game I can’t remember the name of…

  23. 04/06/2012

    @John: It was fun to make the video but more fun playing with such a nice vintage Apple II plus. Kind of makes me want to get an Apple IIe being I used them in high school in the last year or two. I bet that game was “Choplifter”. I still have choplifter for my commodore 64.

  24. 04/06/2012

    This video blog was picked up by Engadget.com today. Their write-up made me want to watch my own video again. HA!
    http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/04/apple-ii-plus-teardown/

  25. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  26. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  27. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  28. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  29. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

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  33. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  34. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  35. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  36. Robby
    05/06/2012

    This is great! Makes me want my old Apple IIgs back as well. I learned applesoft basic back when I was a fifth grader, and pascal in high school. This summer I’m teaching a group of high school kids iOS programming with Objective-C. Man how times have changed. Such a great trip down memory lane. Thank you for the excellent detailed videos!

  37. [...] for easy removal. He’s not sure why—he asks for anyone who knows for sure to comment on his blog post—but he has some ideas: All the chips are socketed, everything is socketed… Sure, I [...]

  38. [...] Harrison got his hands on an old Apple II and meticulously restored the computer to working condition. He details the process in a lengthy [...]

  39. [...] huge fan of anything involving taking a part Macs, either for modding or upgrading/rebuilding, and Todd Harrison has done exactly the latter in his latest project, taking apart an Apple II to repair it and give it a new lease of [...]

  40. [...] It’s been a long time since I’ve pulled apart a computer and re-built it. I can’t even think of a situation where I’d want to, with maybe the exception of trying to rebuilt an old Apple II. Todd Harrison has done just that, tearing down an old Apple II computer, cleaning it up, and rebuild… [...]

  41. Jonathan Leblang
    05/06/2012

    Very nice explanation and trip down memory lane. I had an Apple ][ back in 1980 with most all those same features. Some comments: The Hayes Microcoupler attached to an external box that in turn connected to the phone line — the modem ran at 75, 110, or 300 bps.
    As far as the disk controller in needing to be in slot 6, that was just the standard location, not the required location (at least for Apple DOS — I think that Pascal may have required that location). When the Apple ][ Plus boot ROM started, it started looking for programs to execute starting in slot 7 and working its way down.

  42. [...] for easy removal. He’s not sure why—he asks for anyone who knows for sure to comment on his blog post—but he has some ideas: All the chips are socketed, everything is socketed… Sure, I [...]

  43. Mrengles
    05/06/2012

    Great job!

    I didn’t know I could remember that far back, I learned how to type on one of these Machines in high school.

    Next time i’m over my parent house, I’ll check to see If I still have any software in the attic. I know they still have my Macintosh Classic, and Performa 6200cd collecting dust.

    If only I still had my old car….

  44. 05/06/2012

    @Johnathan Leblang: I will try the disk controller in slot 7 just to see. I know the DOS manual stats to use 6 but you might be right.

  45. 05/06/2012

    @Mrengles: Thanks. Don’t get me started on my old cars. I started with a marvelous Mazda RX4 rotary 1976. I had to fix it up myself because nobody had a clue how to work on a rotary engine back in 1986 when I got the car for $900. It was in great cosmetic condition so it was worth getting it working and it was a real nice ride for many years.

  46. Charles
    05/06/2012

    I noticed at 24min into your first video, you disassemble the Disk ][ unit and notice that one chip is dated 1984 and all the others are dated 1982. I can explain, since I was an Apple II tech.

    That chip on the top center of the Disk ][ unit, part of the internal controller card, was notorious for blowing out. There was one design flaw of this system. If you accidentally dislodged the disk controller card from the internal slots of the Apple II, it would short and blow this chip. I replaced dozens and dozens of these chips. It was almost a distinctive type of damage, usually the chip would overheat and blow a cone of plastic right out of the top of the chip, leaving a little conical concave hole. Other times it would blow out the sides of the chip package. Usually the damage wasn't so bad that it would require replacement of that whole circuit board, but sometimes it ruined the whole circuit.

    So almost certainly this Disk ][ unit has been repaired sometime after 1984, due to the disk cables being pulled, or something that pulled the controller card out of the internal slot in the Apple // case.

    If you have any questions about this or other Apple II repair issues, feel free to email me.

  47. 05/06/2012

    @Charles: I have been hearing that a lot about that chip. No questions right now, everything is running like new.

  48. [...] un vecchio Apple II, riportandolo letteralmente in vita e documentando tutto attraverso il proprio sito personale. Ma al di là dell’operazione, di per sé già interessante, a rendere quanto svolto dal buon [...]

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  53. Bruce Friedman
    07/06/2012

    Todd, thank you so much for that trip down memory lane. I’m of the age to remember the Apple II – I did not have one, but I used the TI 99/4A instead at that time (because I could afford that one on my after-school income).

    Your video was well done and I want you to know that your work is appreciated!

  54. 07/06/2012

    I never used a TI 99. One other computer I use in the day was the Timex Sinclair 1000 and I still have it with the 16k expansion memory card. What a horrible keyboard but still it was a computer and so I was into it heart and sole.

  55. Bobd
    07/06/2012

    Todd – thanks so much for this trip down memory lane. I can’t wait to show my kids tonight … here’s what I grew up with you lucky devils! :) I can’t believe it’s 30 years already …

  56. [...] in Script, da Lucio Bragagnolo Due documenti eccezionali dedicati alla Apple che fu: il restauro meticoloso di un Apple II Plus del 1982, fino a rimetterlo in funzione, e una lunga retrospettiva di Newton nel suo [...]

  57. Lanroth
    12/06/2012

    You triggered a few ancient memories!

    The phone list program is interesting – I remember it. It actually modified the BASIC program listing in memory when you entered data into it. There 150 DATA lines that reflect the current phone listing. When you quit it saves the whole program back to disk using a standard BASIC SAVE command.

    I think it actually POKEd the memory directly.

    I tried to replicate this wonderful hack when I discovered it in 1983 at the age of 8 with very little success :-)

    My first computer was the Apple II EuroPlus in 1982 and I learned it’s ways thoroughly, right down to getting into the system monitor (CALL -151), disassembling the machine code of the ROM and DOS and figuring out how it worked.

    Thanks!

  58. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

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  63. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  64. Charles Stephens
    12/06/2012

    So the 6502 CPU in your Apple II+ was made by Synertek in the 33rd week of 1982. You have probably one of the last production runs of the Apple II+. I fell bad for the original purchaser because the Apple IIe came out in January of the following year.

    Lastly, the Hayes Micromodem II you have runs at a glorious 300 baud with a top speed of 30B/s! It required an external box to connect to a POTS line: http://www.wa4dsy.net/heatherington/hayes/microcoupler01.jpg

  65. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  66. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  67. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  68. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  69. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  70. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  71. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  72. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  73. Openthreads
    12/06/2012

    Reminds me of when, back in the day, I used to spend hours of evening time in my apartment in San Francisco building up my Apple II Plus. Except I eventually got a Z80 CPU card for mine so I could run the CP/M OS and program in C and FORTRAN. Good times! Hee hee.

  74. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  75. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  76. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  77. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  78. 13/06/2012

    @Charles Stephens: That helps explain the great condition the computer was in. The seller had told me he was very young and didn’t really know what to do with this Apple because his parents only had it for a few months before they got the IIe and gave him the Plus which just stayed unused.

  79. 13/06/2012

    @Lanroth: Your right about the phone program. I had noticed that too when I listed the program after typing in my name. I didn’t show that on the video but I was going “How did they programatically change the code?” Poking at the memory makes sense of course.

  80. Chris
    14/06/2012

    Todd thanks for posting these vidoes. This was a real trip down memory lane for me. When I was in 8th grade my school had a couple Apple II computers. I can’t remember if they were the Plus model that you have there, but if not they were very similiar. I have very fond memories from back then spending time with my teacher learning how they worked, and of course playing games. Thanks for taking the time to make these fantastic videos.

  81. KB
    16/06/2012

    Thank you, Todd, for going into explicit detail and work on these old Apple machines! I remember writing BASIC animation programs in my 8th and 9th grade classes back in the day on mostly Apple IIe’s with monochrome or “color” monitors…wish i still had the old 5.25 floppies from my classwork…watching your videos really re-jogged some old details and quirks from the IIe (II plus is close enough to IIe :) )

    Cheers!

  82. 16/06/2012

    @KB, the IIe was so much easier to use and program. The funky keyboard on the Plus still messes me up all the time. I to worked on IIe’s my last year or two of high school but the PLUS was the computer that rocked my world and really I didn’t use one as much as an IIe. I’m trying to get a cheap IIe on eBay but I just want the box and it top shape so I will be turning my cheek to them on eBay for a few years. Most are just junk on eBay.

  83. [...] charming man, Todd Harrison, bought a used Apple II and some drives from Ebay and did what any self-respecting geek would do: [...]

  84. [...] Apple II Plus from 1982 teardown, repair, cleanup and demonstration [...]

  85. [...] Apple II Plus from 1982 teardown, repair, cleanup and demonstration [...]

  86. [...] Apple II Plus from 1982 teardown, repair, cleanup and demonstration [...]

  87. @Todd: Boy, that brings back memories. My early career in computers started in both the retail and support channel for various computer retailers, not to mention cutting my teeth on these and the infamous Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 1. Talk about a blast from the past.

    While I haven’t tried it personally, I have heard of the RetroBrite project which is a self-made cleaner to remedy yellowed plastics. It might have been interesting to try on that Apple case, but it looks as the Clorox solution worked quite well.

    I enjoyed this article as well as some of the other great entries in your blog. I plan on sharing your site with my forum users and site visitors. Wonderful site – keep up the great work!

    Bill DeFelice
    Webmaster
    HobbyBroadcaster.net

  88. 23/09/2012

    Thanks Bill!

  89. manvindar singh
    01/10/2012

    what an article sir…..
    enjoyed every bit of it

  90. 01/10/2012

    You very welcome Manvindar!

  91. [...] Apple II Plus from 1982 teardown, repair, cleanup and demonstration [...]

  92. Richard
    24/01/2013

    Thanks Todd for the great videos and information here.

    I’ve just acquired an Apple ][ europlus here in the UK and it's the first time I've laid eyes on one of these beauties in the flesh.
    I'd only seen them in 80's magazines from my youth. Just love the build quality and simplicity.

    I've recently started collecting some of my favourite 8-bitters of all time and the Apple ][ HAD to be on the list.
    Not having a user manual to hand and doing a little web browsing brought me to your site. Just what I needed to get me over some initial hurdles.

    Seem to have some RAM issues with mine. First noticed it running the 'Brian's theme' program when it would bork after a few minutes.
    Running some RAM test procedures confirms this. New RAM on order so hopefully should be good to go soon.

    By the way - I don't understand the retrObrite comments. The retrObrite process is for removing yellowing from dyed colour plastics.
    The Apple ][ and ][ plus are painted so don’t yellow. The //e etc CAN yellow as they have dyed plastic ?

    Love your enthusiasm and keep up the good work.

    Richard.

  93. 24/01/2013

    @Richard, Thanks for the nice comments. I’m thinking my plastic is stained in some way becuase the color is yellow. For your box, make sure you remove and re-insert those chips before you call them bad. Re-seating the chips can clean the contacts on these old socket-ed computers and fix some problems with now cost.

  94. [...] Apple II Plus from 1982 teardown, repair, cleanup and demonstration [...]

  95. Doug
    19/04/2013

    Thanks very much for the interesting and entertaining discussion! I just recently dug out an old IIe and IIgs that had spent 10 years in my damp crawl space followed by years in the garage after the crawl space flooded. Both cranked up perfectly. Still having some trouble getting my 3.5″ drives to work correctly, but both Sider II hard disks worked, as did all six of the cards in the IIe (parallel printer, serial, RAMdisk, AppleClock, floppy controller, and hard disk controller. Have a pile of other cards not yet installed (another RAM expansion card, ROM+, ROMWriter, and others). I didn’t use a head cleaner on my 5.25″ drive and it was a little flakey for a while, maybe I should try that. Where would one get a 5.25″ head cleaning disk these days? Or a 3.5″ head cleaner?

  96. 30/04/2013

    eBay

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